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17 Days of Adore – Appels + Oranjes

Posted by Jason On April - 7 - 2009

adoreblog

Adore – Track 8 – Appels + Oranjes

Appels + Oranjes is one of my favorite tracks on Adore.

The track evokes the electronics of bands like New Order and Depeche Mode, both bands Corgan sites as influences.  In fact, the Pumpkins covered Depeche Mode’s Never Let Me Down Again, which appeared on a compilation of Depeche Mode covers, and as a b-side on the Rocket single during the Siamese Dream era.

During the Adore recording sessions, Corgan took a different approach.

“I thought I was going to do this really different album,” Corgan told EQ Magazine.  “So typical me, I didn’t use any of my gear.  Like, any.  I went out and bought new guitars and strange amps…Most of my memories with Adore have more to do with programming.”

The success of Eye certainly gave Corgan confidence is his abilities to write with electronic instruments, and Appels + Oranjes showcases that more than any other song on Adore.

I don’t have any information on when the song was completed, but sonically it seems to fit in with early Adore era, post MCIS-era songs like Eye, and The End is the Beginning is the End.

The Adore sessions began with producer Brad Wood (Placebo, Liz Phair), but after an unsuccessful beginning, Corgan re-enlisted Flood to help him shape his ideas into completed songs.  Flood, who has worked with the likes of U2, Depeche Mode, and produced MCIS, was able to forge Corgan’s reels of 1-inch tape with the electronic Pro Tools sessions, and samples to give Adore a more cohesive feel.

Flood’s direction, and experience with bands like Depeche Mode, and Nine Inch Nails more than likely helped Corgan nail down the great sonic elements on Appels + Oranjes.

The song incorporates layer after layer of drum machines, ebow, and synthesizers.  Each one floating in and out at the perfect moment.  Pay special attention to the delay-drenched ebow that enters right after Corgan sings “What if what is isn’t true?”  This is a great example of using melody to fill vacant space.  Once again, the ebow takes center stage, adding to the spacey quality of Adore.

Appels + Oranjes showcases another signature Pumpkins trait: misspelling titles.  Corgan does this often.  Other examples:

Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness

Thru the Eyes of Ruby

Tonight, Tonite

Just to name a few.

Listen to Appels + Oranjes

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